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Wednesday, 30 November 2016

Tech Talk: Willier Cento10 Air


Willier Cento10 Air

The Cento first surfaced in 2006, built to celebrate Wilier’s 100th birthday – Cento meaning ‘hundred’ in Italian. However, it was 2008’s Cento1 that really established the range’s reputation. It was heralded as one of the best all-round race bikes of its time and garnered much praise in the bike press. Add in integrated ‘Alabarda’ bars and kamm-tail tubes and Wilier claims the Cento10Air is 8% faster than its predecessor, the Cento1Air.

The frame's shaping is based around the SR's geometry: it’s suitably aggressive with a long, low riding position, and handling that’s designed to offer a fine balance between sharp steering and stability at speed. The back end is short to keep things nimble and the dropped seatstays are at the lowest point allowed by current UCI regulations, leaving plenty of room for the seat tube and post to offer a little flex for added smoothness.

Willier Cento10 Air Frame

All the frame tubes adopt NACA truncated aerofoil profiles, which are aerodynamic without greatly increasing weight or compromising rigidity. Wilier uses computational fluid dynamics to model airflow over its frames rather than wind tunnel testing. Its results suggest that the new frame is around 3% more aerodynamically efficient than its Cento1 Air. 

It has also moved the seatstay junction down the seat tube as far as the UCI allows to reduce frontal area. The seatstays bulge out at their tops too to smooth airflow over this area. All the cables apart from the front brake are routed internally through the frame and the Wilier Cento10 Air can be set up to work efficiently with mechanical and electronic groupsets from any of the big three suppliers.

The Wilier Cento10 Air adopts direct mount brakes front and rear. This allows Wilier to use wider, thinner forks which have the double benefit of creating less drag between the blades and the spinning wheels and also allowing the bike to take 28mm tyres, although it is supplied with 25s. The direct mount brakes should also provide better power and modulation. 

There’s a custom truncated aerofoil seatpost too, with a single bolt head and 22mm setback, which is made for Wilier by Ritchey. It’s held in place by an expander with a concealed bolt. And Wilier uses a 86.5mm wide pressfit bottom bracket for good power transfer at the cranks and wide compatibility.


Alabarda

Alabarda front view

It’s an all-carbon aero design with a wide flat top and small frontal profile and allows the Cento10’s gear cables to be entirely internally routed through the bar, stem, headset and frame. There are two channels on the undersides of the bar tops through which the cables pass. They then turn into a hollow cavity on the underside of the stem where they’re held in place by a carbon fibre sprung plate, before entering the headset top cap. Here they make another bend and feed through a special aperture in the headset bearing.


Cable route in Alabarda

The steerer tube has a flat section on its front side to help accommodate the cables. aving entered the frame, the cables are then routed internally from the headtube into the down tube, where the outers are anchored in a box under a cover. This allows them to have enough free cable that they do not impede the turning of the bars, without rattling around in the frame. Wilier says it has tested the design to ensure compatibility with all manufacturers’ cabling.


Alabarda, from below

The cables then make their way under the bottom bracket to emerge at the front and rear mechs. There’s a barrel adjuster for the front mech integrated into the down tube cable box. Trimming of the rear mech cables is done via the adjuster on the mech itself. he stem is mounted to the steerer using a wedge rather than bolts, for a really clean look. 




The bar has to have the top and bottom spacer as a minimum for the system to work, but you can add up to 3cm of additional aero shaped spacers to increase bar height if needed. And since the spacers are split they can be added or removed without needing to completely dismantle the headset. 


Highlight:
  • 3% more aerodynamic than Cento 1
  • Alabarda, dropbar and stem combo
  • Works with mechanic and electronic groupset
  • Swallow 28mm tyre
  • Integrated cable route with integrated cable adjuster in downtube



Glossary:

Seatstay: The tube connect seattube with rear end

Seattube: The tube when downtube, toptube, seatstay and chainstay met, its also house for seatpost

Seatpost: Is a tube that extends upwards from the bicycle frame to the saddle. The amount that it extends out of the frame can usually be adjusted, and there is usually a mark that indicates the minimum insertion.

Downtube: The tube connect headtube with seattube

Bottom Bracket: The bottom bracket on a bicycle connects the crankset (chainset) to the bicycle and allows the crankset to rotate freely. It contains a spindle that the crankset attaches to, and the bearings that allow the spindle and cranks to rotate. The chainrings and pedals attach to the cranks. The bottom bracket fits inside the bottom bracket shell, which connects the seat tube, down tube and chain stays as part of the bicycle frame.


Source:
http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/product-news/wilier-cento-10-air-224389
http://www.cyclist.co.uk/news/1528/wilier-cento10-air-review
http://www.bikeradar.com/news/article/wilier-cento10-air-aero-road-bike-launched-47389/
http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/product-news/wiliers-new-alabarda-bar-stem-combo-cleverly-hides-shifter-cables-235317


Ride On!


Monday, 28 November 2016

Tech Talk: Cervelo P5X

Cervelo P5X

Cervélo are boldly claiming that the P5X is the ‘most technologically advanced triathlon bike ever made’. The end result is a machine that aims not only to be fast in a racing environment, but also one that is practical when training and travelling. To this end, the P5X has customisable storage with various containers and mounts for bottles, tools, food and spare clothing, and also a folding aero bar 

Disc Brakes and QR

It seems that disc brakes are the way forward for tri bikes and discs will become more prevalent. The addition of disc brakes plus the nature of the frame means the addition of thru axles as well with a 142×12 rear and 100×12 front QR thru axle. The brakes are flat mount with 160mm rotors and TRP’s HYRD mechanical/hydraulic calipers.

You can have the most aero bike in the world in the wind tunnel, but if you’re taping gels to the top tube and strapping tubes to the frame, those numbers go out the window. To make sure the bike is as fast as possible, the P5X features three main storage compartments that are both built in and removable depending on the location for the perfect amount of storage.

On the top tube, the SmartPak features a structured zippered pouch with internal organization for gels, a center section for deeper storage, and even a small tray for electrolyte tabs. It can be removed from the frame completely if not needed and includes a cover for the hole in the frame. 

Stealth Box

In front of the bottom bracket is the Stealth Box which is the one completely integrated storage compartment. Nestled inside the opening is a small box which is big enough to hold a spare tube, small co2 inflator, and a multi tool to keep the weight down low. Last, the SpeedCase is the third storage area which is also removable and bolts to a standard water bottle mount on the down tube. There is a secondary water bottle mount on top of the SpeedCase when the box is in use so you don’t lose the mounting location. 

SpeedCase Box

Additional bottle storage is offered behind the saddle with a built in mount. The seat post can actually pierce the upper beam and is held in place by a single pinch bolt, but the post can be cut at the bottom for maximum aerodynamics. The adjustability of the seat post allows a 74-81º effective seat tube angle

Front Review

Along with storage and aerodynamics, the frame features a number of impressive features to make it fit a huge range of rider and to make it easier to travel. Instead of a more traditional steerer tube and spacer arrangement, the P5X essentially uses a seat post for the aerobars that can be raised or lowered to the desired position. You can adjust 112mm of sliding stack and 91mm of reach adjustment along with a base bar that can be flipped 180º with 0 to 12º of tilt. Electronics can be integrated into the frame behind the handlebars with a window built in for junction boxes. Between the elbow pads you’ll also find another water bottle cage mount.

Break The Bike

Another feature to make your life easier when travelling with this bike, you can break the bike down, remove the four screws that hold the base bar together and it divides into two pieces which are then held to each fork leg with a neoprene sleeve. That allows you to slide the bike into the case without messing with the headset and preserving most of your settings.



Highlight:


  • 3 box storage, 2 removable and 1 integrated
  • No seattube and seatstays
  • Using QR in front, TA in rear wheel
  • 3 bottle mount, behind bar, behind the saddle and in the downtube
  • Folding bar!



Glossary:

Bottom Bracket: The bottom bracket on a bicycle connects the crankset (chainset) to the bicycle and allows the crankset to rotate freely. It contains a spindle that the crankset attaches to, and the bearings that allow the spindle and cranks to rotate. The chainrings and pedals attach to the cranks. The bottom bracket fits inside the bottom bracket shell, which connects the seat tube, down tube and chain stays as part of the bicycle frame.

Seatpost: is a tube that extends upwards from the bicycle frame to the saddle. The amount that it extends out of the frame can usually be adjusted, and there is usually a mark that indicates the minimum insertion (or maximum extension)


Source:
http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/product-news/cervelo-launches-radical-new-p5x-bike-288472
http://www.bikerumor.com/2016/10/05/close-new-cervelo-p5x-tri-superbike-plus-actual-weight/
http://www.bikerumor.com/2016/10/04/cervelo-takes-kona-new-p5x-triathlon-superbike/
http://aerogeeks.com/2016/10/04/kona-2016-cervelo-p5x-first-look/
http://www.bikeradar.com/road/news/article/cervelo-p5x-explores-a-life-without-uci-limitations-48314/


Ride On!





Tour Rig: Specialized Sequoia

Specialized Sequoia

The Specialized Sequoia was first designed by Tim Neenan in the early 1980’s. Later, Jim Merz improved upon the design of this versatile bicycle. While the 1980’s steel Sequoia had a certain panache, the aluminum models of the 2000’s somehow lost their sex appeal. The Sequoia died out in the 2000’s.

The new and old Sequoia

The new Sequoia is positioned squarely between Specialized’s two “adventure” models: It’s more dirt-worthy than the Diverge, but lighter and faster than the AWOL. Complementing the bike is a full line of bags, tires, and wheels designed for the path less traveled. Geometry-wise, this is a model that “skews the line between a traditional road bike and a dedicated touring rig”. A long wheelbase (1053mm / 41.46in for a size 56) matches up to a low bottom bracket (292.5mm / 11.52in for size 56) while 71.5 / 73.5 degree head tube and seat angles have been chosen to keep the handling from being too lazy.


Bikepacking setup

The Sequoia uses custom drawn tubing (it calls “tour tubing”—the same name as the original 70s version) for each frame size, from 50cm to 61cm and it shows. There’s also a custom fork, with rack, fender and cargo cage mounts, as well as a new headset. Thru axles, flat mounts, internal routing, and wide range 1x drivetrain systems had taken over the drop bar market, making a bike like this almost as capable as a mountain bike in terms of gear range. The Cobble Gobbler post and its funky design is met at the cockpit with their new drop bar, which has 20mm rise, flair and a shallow drop.

Flair and shallow dropbar

There are rack and fender mounts, as well as braze ons for a third bottle cage. Other details include internal routing for generator lamps, clearance for a 45mm tire, and new thru-axle hubs. The brake and gear cables are managed really neatly under the downtube, and if you want to use Di2 gearing, this frame is ready and surprisingly, this bike uses a threaded bottom bracket shell. 

Internal route cable fork

The most impressive feature of this bike is the carbon fork. Thru-axle, internal routing, flat mount disc brakes, hidden fender mounts, drilled crown, cargo cage attachments and designed to carry a front load with rack mounts. All with around 50mm of clearance. This fork is what everyone has been asking the industry to make for some time now. The Sequoia available in three different models and six different sizes. Each frame size uses a different blend of tubing to achieve the same ride feel. All three bikes will be steel, but only the top two will come with the carbon fork.



Highlight:
  • Electronic drivetrain ready
  • Disc brake with flat mount
  • Swallow 45mm tyres
  • Chromoly frame with carbon fork
  • Mounting for front and rear rack
  • 3 bosses for bottle cage, you can add 2 more bottle cage in fork if you don't install a front rack
  • Thru axle

Glossary:

Headtube: The head tube is the part of a cycle's tubular frame within which the front fork steer tube is mounted.

Headset: The headset is the set of components on a bicycle that provides a rotatable interface between the bicycle fork and the head tube of the bicycle frame. A typical headset consists of two cups that are pressed into the top and bottom of the headtube. Inside the two cups are bearings which provide a low friction contact between the bearing cup and the steerer.

Bottom Bracket: The bottom bracket on a bicycle connects the crankset (chainset) to the bicycle and allows the crankset to rotate freely. It contains a spindle that the crankset attaches to, and the bearings that allow the spindle and cranks to rotate. The chainrings and pedals attach to the cranks. The bottom bracket fits inside the bottom bracket shell, which connects the seat tube, down tube and chain stays as part of the bicycle frame.


Source:
http://www.bicycling.com
http://www.cyclingabout.com
https://www.bikerumor.com
http://www.bikeradar.com
http://theradavist.com


Ride On!


Daily Drivetrain Care

Dirty Drivetrain

How often do you lube your chain; after each and every ride, once a week or only when it starts to squeak? And what about cleaning; how often should the chain be degreased? Did you know, you're lovely bicycle performance will turn to be poor and cost you more when you doesn't care the chain, sprocket and chainring.  

Let’s start by looking at what drivechain wear actually is, beginning with the chain. Each link in the chain consists of two inner and two outer plates, a pair of rollers and pins to hold it all together. There are also bushings that the rollers sit on, but on a modern chain these are formed as part of the inner plate. You’ve probably heard people refer to ‘chain stretch’. This is when the individual chain components wear; the pins, rollers and the bushings are ground away. A tiny amount of play in these parts means the chain gets longer—that’s the stretch that people refer to. 

Top, chain wear within limit, Below..you better change the chain

As the distance between each pin grows, the other drivetrain components wear to match the ‘stretched’ chain. With this, the ‘valley’ between each tooth grows wider and the teeth themselves become more pointed with a slight hook on one side. A chain can be quite worn and it’ll continue to function, so long as the chainring and cassette are worn to match. The problem occurs when you decide it’s time to fit a fresh chain, as it won’t mesh well with the worn teeth.

Worn Sprocket, time to replace it

If the drivetrain is too worn, the new chain may run rough and will suffer accelerated wear. If the teeth are really worn, the new chain will slip under heavy pedalling load—a potentially dangerous issue. It’s certainly possible to fit a new chain and retain your existing drivetrain components. The key is to replace the chain before it wears too much. To do this you can track the chain wear with a purpose built tool. Chain checkers come in many different styles and you’ll find wideranging opinions on which is best. Some devices provide a simple ‘good’ or ‘replace’ indication of the wear while others show the wear incrementally and let you decide how far you’ll push it.

With 1X drivetrains it’s equally important to keep a close eye on chainring wear, as it cops all of the wear, all of the time. They aren’t the most expensive item so it’s good practice to fit a new one every now and then; a new ring with your third replacement chain is fairly safe.

Wiping the chain

Tracking chain wear is one thing but minimising it to begin with is of equal importance. Start by wiping the chain over after every off-road ride. Backpedal whilst holding a rag around the chain and apply some lube to assist with flushing any crud from within the rollers. This works best with a lighter viscosity lube. Keep wiping and lubing until the rag still looks reasonably clean after coming in contact with the chain. You want the lube inside the pins and rollers, not on the outside where it’ll attract dirt. By following this post-ride cleaning regime, you’ll have less muck build-up and you’re less likely to need a full drivetrain degrease. 

Chain soak in a tub of degreaser

In time however, the drivetrain will need a more thorough going over. The best way to do a full degrease is to remove the chain completely and soak it in a tub of degreaser. It’s vital that you get any residual degreaser back out of the chains. With regular care you will be more familiar with how your chainring should look and you’ll be better equipped to spot drivetrain wear.


Problems to Watch for When Cleaning

Tight Links 
These are links that no longer bend smoothly. To spot them, pedal your chain slowly backwards and watch as each link passes through the tight turns of your rear derailleur. Most are caused by dirt or corrosion between link plates; these can be fixed by cleaning, lubricating and a little flexing back and forth. Others are the result of improper pin installation or serious chain damage. Damaged chains should be completely replaced. 

Chain Stretch 
As chains wear, they become longer. This is called stretch, which is a misnomer because nothing actually stretches. Chains lengthen as wear occurs between the rollers and the link pins. This creates slop or free play that leads to gear "skipping" in some cases. It also causes extra wear and tear on your chain rings and rear cog teeth.


Clean and ready to roll

Source:
Mountain Biking Australia Nov-Jan 17
https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/bike-chain.html
http://thebicyclechain.com/how-to/how-to-clean-your-chain-and-drivetrain-pg125.htm
http://www.slocyclist.com/how-to-clean-your-drivetrain-comprehensive-bike-maintenance/


Ride On!




Thursday, 24 November 2016

Tech Talk: Giant TCR Series 2017

Giant Advanced SL

The TCR is an immensely popular road frame with heritage dating back to the 90’s when Giant bikes with compact frames were ridden by the likes of Lauren Jalabert. With a light, stiff and compact design this is a bike designed for racing. There are three models of the disc-equipped TCR - Advanced SL Disc, Advanced Pro Disc and Advanced Disc

Essentially the three models are the same frame in terms of tube profiles and shapes, but the difference is in the grade of carbon used to build the frame, and the headset standard on the entry-level model. The Advanced SL Disc is the lightest in the range and uses the company’s Advanced SL-grade composite, while the two lower models use a cheaper grade of carbon fibre, with the least expensive Advanced Disc using a fork with an OverDrive head tube and fork, not the oversized OverDrive 2 of the two more expensive models.

Hidden seat clamp

More noticeable difference is the regular seatpost on the Advanced Pro Disc and Advanced Disc, whereas the top-end Advanced SL Disc has an integrated seat mast, just like the range-topping Defy Advanced as well. To cater for disc brakes the new bike gets 12mm thru-axles at both ends, the front disc hose is routed externally while the other gear cables and rear disc hose is tidied away inside the frame.

In terms of tech, Overdrive is Giant’s original oversized fork steerer-tube technology. Designed to provide solid front-end steering performance, the system’s oversized headset bearings and tapered steerer tube provide optimal steering stiffness. Road models feature 1 1/8-inch top and 1 1/4-inch bottom bearings, while the mountain version features 1 1/8-inch top and 1 1/2-inch bottom bearings. So. emm...you will need a new stem, spacers and upper headset to deal with it.

The top steerer from 1 1/8 (left) and 1 1/4 (right)

Why Giant push the new "standart"? Because Giant claim OverDrive provides up to 15 percent more torsional steering stiffness than straight steerer-tube designs. This translates into much more accurate steering input from a rider’s hands, through the handlebar and stem, and down to the front wheel. Whether hammering uphill or carving through a corner, OverDrive transmits input directly to the front wheel for more precise handling.

After a years, now Giant had Overdrive 2, its an oversized headset bearings (1 1/4-inch top and 1 1/2-inch bottom bearings) and a tapered steerer tube combine for unprecedented steering performance with no additional weight. Why Giant expand it again? Compared to the already stiff OverDrive system, OverDrive 2 provides up to 30 percent more torsional steering stiffness. So we (cyclist) will get a more steering precision.




Highlight:


  • Thru Axle
  • Disc Brakes
  • Integrated Seatpost
  • Overdrive and Overdrive 2 Steerer tube
  • Internal route for cables
  • Giant carbon own materials

Glossary:

Headtube: The head tube is the part of a cycle's tubular frame within which the front fork steer tube is mounted.

Headset: The headset is the set of components on a bicycle that provides a rotatable interface between the bicycle fork and the head tube of the bicycle frame. A typical headset consists of two cups that are pressed into the top and bottom of the headtube. Inside the two cups are bearings which provide a low friction contact between the bearing cup and the steerer.

Tapered Steerer: A tapered steerer is 1 1/8 inch at the top and 1 1/2 inch at the bottom.


Source:
http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/cycling-weekly/new-giant-tcr-disc-launched-245868 http://www.bikeradar.com/road/news/article/2017-giant-tcr-advanced-disc-road-race-bikes-full-details-and-pricing-47341/
http://road.cc/content/tech-news/199685-first-look-giant-tcr-advanced-disc-2017-range
https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/blog/giant-tcr-advanced-pro-disc-2017-first-impressions
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-ca/technology/overdrive/50/


Ride On!



Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Adora-Bike: Rivendell Joe Appaloosa

Rivendell Joe Appaloosa

Time seems to stand still at Rivendell Bicycle Works. Want the latest and greatest? Carbon framesets, disc brakes, electronic shifting? You are cordially invited to shop elsewhere. But if you seek comfortable, durable steel with sensible, reliable components, you’ve come to the right shop.


Joe Appaloosa Badge

The Joe is an all rounder bike. It’s not for stunts, boulder-bouncing, or loaded expeditionary off-road touring, but as a trail bike for sober. The Joe is a killer touring bike that easily handles fire trails, though. Larger sizes get a double top tube and 700c wheels; smaller sizes get 26" wheels and a single top tube.

It’s good with tires as small as 35mm and as fat as 50mm (with a fender). A fender whisperer can make it work with a 53mm tire, but if you need to ride fatter than 50mm, you must be riding in dirt, and if you’re riding dirt in the rain, fenders will just jam up with mud.

Beautiful fork crown
Compared to mainstream bikes, the whole Joe is a quirk, the frame is CrMo steel, with SILVER brand tubes and fully lugged (both, tubing and lugs produce by Rivendell). The crown is a new beauty, internally known as No. 6. The bolts at top the ornate fork crown will accept a Tubus rear rack and some Nitto racks. Rivendell recommends its Nitto Mark’s M1 rack, which lets you carry an additional 4.4 pounds up front.


Loaded and Roll


Glossary:


Toptube: The tube link between the headtube and seattube.


Source:
http://rivbike.tumblr.com/post/134881932154/dark-mustard-aka-butterscotch-sample-arrived
http://rivbike.tumblr.com/post/135532314029/the-wannabe-legendary-joe-appaloosa-appaloosa-is
https://www.adventurecycling.org/adventure-cyclist/online-features/road-test-rivendell-joe-appaloosa/


Ride On!