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Monday, 15 August 2016

Cycling News Selection 8/16/2016


Lazer Tonic road helmet review

The Lazer Tonic is an excellent budget road helmet that looks and feels like a much more expensive lid. At 230g for a Medium, it weighs the same as helmets more than twice as expensive, such as the Specialized S-Works Prevail or the Bontrager Velocis. Best bike helmets: a buyer's guide to help you find what's right for you Best road cycling helmets: 8 of our top picks Internal channeling on the Tonic keeps air moving across the head, and probably reduces the weight a little, too. Ventilation is very good for a helmet at this price point — not as airy as something like the Prevail but much better than helmets in its class. Read more...


Giordana Sahara bib shorts review

Giordana's Sahara bib shorts are built for, you guessed it, hot weather riding. With purposeful breathability and focused compression, they're also aimed at uphill specialists whose goal is to minimize weight. Read more...








POC Tectal helmet review

The new Tectal blends design elements from POC’s Octal road helmet with the company’s first half-shell mountain bike helmet, the Trabec While many riders enjoyed the Trabec, I was not one of them. I found the ventilation poor and I never got along with the non-adjustable visor; it always seemed to be in the way. POC claims the Tectal is nearly as well vented as the road-going Octal. There are nine vents across the forehead, three over the crown, and five exhaust vents at the rear. My time on the trail confirms POC's claims. Air flows easily through the helmet, making it one of the better vented trail helmets I’ve tested. Read more...


5 simple steps to cycling saddle comfort

What’s the one biggest factor when it comes to cycling comfort for most riders? The saddle. When your set-up works correctly, you don’t even notice it. When it doesn’t it can be one of the most uncomfortable and downright traumatic things you’ve ever experienced. Getting saddle comfort right can mean the difference between loving and hating cycling. Read more...






Giant Defy Advanced SL0 review

The Defy Advanced SL chassis is at the top of an extensive line-up, ranging from a lightweight, lightly priced aluminium machine to three levels of carbon models. At a claimed 730g (M), the SL is the lightest by some margin, partly due to the integrated seatpost. The post has advantages in that the carbon can be manipulated to save weight over a clamped post and engineered to offer plenty of flex — there is more uninterrupted tube to play with. Read more...




12 bike maintenance misconceptions that could cost you time and money 

Here's a list of common maintenance misconceptions that I see and hear riders — and some mechanics — repeating all the time. While none of these are a cycle crime on a par with wearing socks with SPD sandals, they are easy enough to stop doing (unless, of course you disagree with the points below). Read more...





Genesis Equilibrium Disc 10 review

Genesis is up-front about the Equilibrium Disc 10’s primary functions – we’re not looking at a race rocket but at an easy-going ride that echoes the brand’s ever-popular steel-framed Equilibrium, only with the addition of disc brakes. Or, as Genesis puts it, ‘It’s an ideal road disc bike for those who favour comfort, stability and fun over KOM leaderboards.’ But even with modern components fitted, how will a steel-framed bike fare against similarly priced aluminium and carbon bikes? Only one way to find out…Read more...






Tech Talk: Are your bike tires too wide for your rims? Here’s how to get it right

With the explosion of Boost, Plus bikes, Mid Fat and other portly new rim and tire sizes for everything from road to cyclocross to gravel to mountain bikes, it’s a wonder there isn’t more confusion as to what will actually work together. And by “work together”, we don’t just mean whether or not it’ll mount. We wanted to know what the compatibility limitations are for optimum performance and, more importantly, safety. If we’ve learned one thing from Mavic’s presentations over the years, it’s that tire and rim sizes really and truly are designed to work in tandem. Step outside the guidelines and you risk poor performance, component damage, or even a total blowout. And it’s not just Mavic. Read more...




Source:
http://www.bikeradar.com/
http://www.cyclist.co.uk/
http://www.bikerumor.com/


Ride On!




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