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Wednesday, 17 August 2016

Cycling News Selection 08/18/2016

Cube Analog 29 review

Cube has managed to pack a lot of value into the Analog despite still selling through local bike shops, but sketchy tyres and a cramped cockpit give you all the wrong signals when you tackle tougher terrain. A neat feature of the Analog is that Cube tries to match wheel size to rider size. That means that you get the choice of 650b wheels in the 14”, 16” and 18” frames, and 29” items on the 17", 19", 21" and 23" models, giving medium sized riders plenty of choice and larger or smaller riders better tuned handling. We opted for the big wheeler to make the most of their smooth rolling and speed boosting properties. Read more...


Rose X-Lite CWX 8800 review

German online retailer Rose has previous for producing well-specced, great value bikes – and it’s pulled out all the stops in the CWX 8800. This is an eye-catching machine that brings sculpted aero tube profiles to the world of disc brakes. You reckon that discs are only for gravel or endurance machines? Think again. The CWX 8800 doesn’t whisper aero road bike so much as scream it, from the horizontal time trial-style junction of top-tube and bladed seat-tube – complete with rear wheel-hugging cutaway – to the near-vertical seatpost. The huge down-tube and bulbous head-tube may look weighty, but aren’t. Read more...


Maxxis Aggressor 29x2.3 EXO tyre review 

The Maxxis Aggressor is a new tyre that’s not quite as burly as the company’s popular High Roller II, DHR II and DHF models, but has more bite than the Ardent. If you’re considering a new tread pattern for trail riding or enduro racing in dry conditions, the Aggressor is an excellent choice. I tested the Aggressor in the 29x2.3 size with the with a tubeless-ready, EXO casing. (Maxxis also offers the Aggressor in a 27.5x2.3 version.) Weight for my pair of test tyres was 905g. Read more...




Specialized Allez Comp review

The Specialized Allez has been around in one form or another since 1981. For 2016, the Allez Comp heads a smaller range, with the stated intention of providing a responsive and compliant ride that’s as at home on a 100-miler as it is in a criterium race. Equivalent frame geometry to Specialized’s race-proven bikes, allied to a stiff front end and the inherent sharpness of an alloy frame could help it live up to this promise. Its spec makes it ripe for upgrading as your riding improves, but is it too much of a compromise as it stands? Read more...





Spiuk Obuss

Aero helmets have never been the most accommodating of shells to wear while on the road. In the pursuit of speed, they can be as uncomfortable to wear as ungainly to look at. However, Spiuk has gone to a lot of effort to make the Obuss more than just a cool-looking piece of kit. Complete with air-funnelling creases over the top of the crown and an accompanying black, white and fluoro-green colour scheme, it certainly turns heads, in a good way (it's also available in a white, red and black scheme too). I can't vouch for the science without a wind tunnel, but it does seem to resist and deflect gusts of wind, which suggests it handles fast moving air well. Read more...




Six things which affect your comfort in the saddle 

The contact points with the bike are vital to get right in order to maximise comfort and performance on the bike. The saddle, along with the handlebar and pedals, is one of the three contact points and arguably the most important because you spend the vast majority of your riding time sat on it. As a result, saddle discomfort is a serious issue because it can not only reduce your enjoyment of riding your bike, but could also potentially cause injury, too. If you struggle with pain in the saddle area, you certainly aren’t the first and won’t be the last. Here are six potential causes – sometimes learned through painful experience – and how to remedy them. Read more....



Review: Salsa Pony Rustler

Salsa Cycles is not one to shy away from big tires, so it is only natural to see another one of its bikes with a bit of extra rubber show up at our door for review. This time around it’s the Pony Rustler, Salsa’s 27plus rig sired from the esteemed line of the Horsethief. In fact the two bikes are so similar, they might be better classified as twins. I think the Pony Rustler just decided to wear different shoes and jacket to make sure we didn’t mistake one for the other. And where did that name come from? Jokingly, Pete Koski, the product design engineer for the Pony Rustler, told me “It rhymes with Horsethief.” I’m kind of glad Pete designs bikes and doesn’t write poetry (that I know of). Read more...



The evolution of the specialized enduro

Evolution is not what you’d call “snappy”. About 5.8 million years ago our ancestral line split off from that of the great apes. While there was much hooting, lurching about on hind legs and awkward high-fiving at the time, things quickly stalled out. For three million years. It took three thousand friggin' millennia for Homo Habilis to stumble upon a rock and think, “Hell, I bet I could use this thing to smack my neighbor and steal his pile of ants.” Three million years to invent the handle-less hammer. So, yeah, evolution—it’s not so quick on the gas. The exception to this rule? The modern mountain bike. Read more...





Source:
http://www.bikeradar.com/
http://www.cyclist.co.uk/
http://road.cc/content/
https://roadcyclinguk.com/
http://dirtragmag.com/
http://www.pinkbike.com/


Ride On!



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